BelTech 2015 The internet of Things

The main theme of the discussion was that IoT (Internet of Things) was everywhere. Michael Crossey (Intel) discussed the changes in IoT and how it is related to the dropping cost of tech. This is related to Moore’s lawThe observation made in 1965 by Gordon Moore, co-founder of Intel, that the number of transistors per square inch on integrated circuits had doubled every year since the integrated circuit was invented. Moore predicted that this trend would continue for the foreseeable future.

Progrssion of IoT

Moore’s law can create great value and improve IoT, Intel are using this to build a reference model for vendors to create and expand IoT and help grow their products. John Shaw from Kingspan talk primarily on his own experiences with IoT with his business which provides smart solar solutions. Their solar PV adoption is powered by Intel Quark, Kingspan sees the IoT as a way of connecting not only devices but people, animals and objects in a smart way. John was very quick to brag about the advancements of Kingspan and how their head office is a carbon negative office. IoT helped to achieve this goal by using smart systems that talk to each other and allow the office to work efficiently.

Working with Large Systems

Joe Hughes of Glen Dimplex also focused on how his company was making advancements in the home and commercial cooling/heating by using IoT devices. Using smart heaters customers could control the heating in an energy efficient way. A system built with cloud controlled heating and having direct links to customers systems allows Glen Dimplex to provide an advanced service. Joe also talked about how this could in fact help the national grid. Joe explained that being able to monitor customers on site devices they can monitor energy usages and patterns, which can allow the national grid control the spinning up and down of resources. A question was put to the panel on the security implications of these systems. A product that talks to 1000’s of customer devices and also can talk to the national grid could have the potential to bring down one of the largest connected systems in the country. This is a valid point but as with any product the security must be a high priority.

IoT in Health

Gareth Tolerton of Total Mobile talked about the impact IoT has on health care and how capturing data on patients can help to provide a better health care system. Working with tech like smart locks can provide safe and much needed services to patients that receive at home care. Allowing the programmatic access to care workers. This system addresses issues with people who feel isolated and vulnerable as care workers can be allowed access without having to obtain keys for a patient’s home, if a care worker no longer treats or is linked to a patient then the access can be revoked. Other IoT systems can help to provide personally tailored health care for patients, but as mentioned by Gareth work is still needed to provide trust in the data collected and sufficiently protect the data.

Take Away

One of my main concerns with the growing IoT market space is the maturity of the network and infrastructure currently in place. I recently watched a promotional video for a smart bike pedal that connected via a sim card to the internet and provided the rider with data. I struggle to see the feasibility of devices like this and other IoT devices. I’m currently with a major mobile provider and I struggle to get a full connection when in the centre of Belfast. Bandwidth, connection speeds and coverage are still big issues faced by many people. If we flood the networks with devices fighting for connection we could cripple the already struggling infrastructure.

 

chrislaughlin

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *